What would a truly disabled-accessible city look like?

What would a truly disabled-accessible city look like?

Most cities are utterly unfriendly to people with disabilities – but with almost one billion estimated to be urban-dwellers by 2050, a few cities are undergoing a remarkable shift.

To David Meere, a visually impaired man from Melbourne, among the various obstacles to life in cities is another that is less frequently discussed: fear.

“The fear of not being able to navigate busy, cluttered and visually oriented environments is a major barrier to participation in normal life,” says Meere, 52, “be that going to the shops, going for a walk in the park, going to work, looking for work, or simply socialising.”

To find out what an accessible city would look like and how it would make disabled people feel independent click here

 

Double amputee Billy Monger still counts himself 'lucky'

Double amputee Billy Monger still counts himself 'lucky'

Atos assessors told to keep disability benefit approvals low, film suggests

Atos assessors told to keep disability benefit approvals low, film suggests